The Gay Divorcee (1934) 720p YIFY Movie

The Gay Divorcee (1934)

The Gay Divorcee is a movie starring Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, and Alice Brady. An American woman travels to England to seek a divorce from her absentee husband, where she meets - and falls for - a dashing performer.

IMDB: 7.61 Likes

  • Genre: Comedy | Musical
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 1.27G
  • Resolution: / fps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 107
  • IMDB Rating: 7.6/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 1 / 1

The Synopsis for The Gay Divorcee (1934) 720p

Mimi Glossop wants a divorce so her Aunt Hortense hires a professional to play the correspondent in apparent infidelity. American dancer Guy Holden meets Mimi while visiting Brightbourne (Brighton) and she thinks he is the correspondent. The plot is really an excuse for song and dance. The movie won three Academy nominations and the first Oscar for Best Song: "The Continental", a twenty-two minute production number.


The Director and Players for The Gay Divorcee (1934) 720p

[Director]Mark Sandrich
[Role:]Fred Astaire
[Role:]Edward Everett Horton
[Role:]Alice Brady
[Role:]Ginger Rogers


The Reviews for The Gay Divorcee (1934) 720p


Gay Divorcée- We All Need Other Correspondents Like This ***1/2Reviewed byedwagreenVote: 8/10

"The Gay Divorce" produced the first song ever to be honored with an Academy award in 1934. That catchy tune was the continental. That elaborate, lengthy dance sequence was just truly memorable. Everyone would want to kick up their heels and start dancing to beautiful music, dangerous rhythm, etc.

The thin plot evolves around Mimi(Ginger) going with her eccentric aunt (played with memorable timing by Alice Brady) to lawyer Eggbert. (Edward Everett Horton) Seems that Mimi wants to divorce her husband and Horton hires a correspondent, an Italian gigolo, who does this for a living to provoke her husband. Of course, Eggbert has a nephew, Guy Holden (Fred Astaire) who falls for Mimi as the fun truly begins. Imagine, Mimi soon has two correspondents. Naturally, she dances up quite a storm with partner Astaire.

The ending is absolutely hilarious, but it's the great dance sequence and chemistry between Astaire and Rogers that makes this film.

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are entertaining enough in their first starring film of The Gay DivorcéeReviewed bytavmVote: 8/10

After causing a sensation in Flying Down to Rio with their dance sequence there, RKO decided to give Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers a whole movie to themselves the following year. This would eventually lead to a series of films starring them to mostly great box office results. As it was, this would be the first time that Astaire would pursue Ms. Rogers with the latter resisting at first before a mistaken identity plot also takes effect. The comedy involving them and supporting players like Alice Brady, Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore, and Erik Rhodes was funny enough to me but it's really the songs and dances that really makes these movies enjoyable enough for repeat viewings. The "Night & Day" sequence, especially, really puts the Astaire-Rogers dance numbers in full force and the later one called "The Continental" provides some fun among other dancers not to mention a now-forgotten singer named Lilian Miles. Oh, and Betty Grable-who was 17 at the time-also does a fine number called "Let's K-nock K-nees" with Horton who seemed game enough. Really, all I'll say now is The Gay Divorcée is well worth seeing for the emergence of the classic movie dance team of Astaire & Rogers! Trivia note: William Austin, who plays Ginger's husband she's trying to divorce, eventually played Alfred the butler in the Batman serials in the '40s. His look there would eventually inspire DC Comics to change their previous physical look for Alfred to one that's thin and has facial hair.

Fred and GingerReviewed byjotix100Vote: 7/10

After hearing Fred Astaire put his stamp in a song, it's hard to imagine anyone else attempting to improve in what seems to be the definite rendition of it. That is the case when Mr. Astaire sings Cole Porter's elegant "Night and Day". In pairing Ginger Rogers with Mr. Astaire, Hollywood hit the jackpot as it produced a winning combination that went from film to film with such ease and panache, it will never be imitated.

Mark Sandrich worked with Ms. Rogers and Mr. Astaire in several movies. Somehow, "The Gay Divorcée" is one of their best collaboration. This film is a lot of fun to watch, even after more than 70 years after it was made. It speaks volumes for all the people involved in the production of this movie.

The Great Depression was the right background when movies like this were made. In a way, it was an escape from the harsh realities of the times America was going through. The public went to the movies to see their favorite stars that were shown in such a glamorous roles. How could anyone not admire the great Fred Astaire, always impeccably dressed? Or how could not any woman in the theater envy Ms. Rogers's beauty and easy grace? That era made it right for Hollywood to show the world a sensitivity and sophistication that only few rich types were able to enjoy in real life, while the rest was trying to eke out a life of whatever work they could find.

The musical numbers are amazing. "The Continental" alone, must have blown the budget of the picture. Imagine how much it would cost today to have all those dancers in a sound stage! Not only that, but in that lengthy number, there are at least four changes of costumes for the women. Also, he is delightful singing "Looking for a Needle in a Haystack". A young and radiant Betty Grable makes an appearance singing "Let's K-knock K-knees" in which she shows a bit of her enormous charm and talent.

Ginger Rogers makes a gorgeous Mimmi Glassop. Alice Brady, is perfect as the dizzy Aunt Hortense. Edward Everett Horton plays an excellent Egbert Fitzgerald, the divorce lawyer. Erik Rhodes is one of the best things in the film; his Signor Tonetti injects a funny shot into the movie. Eric Blore, as the waiter, has great moments in the movie.

In setting the film in London and Brighton, a rich texture is added to this winning picture that will remain a favorite that will live forever because of the chemistry that Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire produced in anything they did together.

The Gay Divorcee (1934) 720p Related Movies

Mission: Impossible - Fallout (2018) Poster

Mission: Impossible - Fallout (2018)

Searching (2018) Poster

Searching (2018)

Who's Your Monkey? (2007) Poster

Who's Your Monkey? (2007)

Outlaw King (2018) Poster

Outlaw King (2018)

Time Freak (2018) Poster

Time Freak (2018)

The Farmer's Daughter (1947) Poster

The Farmer's Daughter (1947)

Follow the Fleet (1936) Poster

Follow the Fleet (1936)

The Pastor and the Pro (2018) Poster

The Pastor and the Pro (2018)